Changing Institutional Procurement Behavior to Achieve Energy Savings

Publication Type

Conference Paper

Date Published

08/2018

LBNL Report Number

LBNL-2001182

Abstract

Although federal policies regarding energy-efficient product procurement (EEPP) are long-standing and well-established, federal buyers do not typically request energy-efficient products when making purchases. This is a large missed opportunity: full compliance could save the U.S. federal government roughly $500 million in energy cost annually. In 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) began a new set of program activities to increase federal compliance with these procurement requirements. Program interventions included increased communication with contracting officers during the solicitation process; development of enhanced, targeted training; and collection and dissemination of procurement best practices across the federal sector. We have collected and analyzed ~2,500 solicitations from over 40 different federal agencies to evaluate the influence of these interventions. Compared to pre-intervention years (FY15 and FY11), annual compliance rates for FY16 and FY17 increased by about 10%. This paper provides an overview of the data collection process, analysis framework, intervention method, and results of our analysis. We discuss strategies to increase compliance rates by examining institutional factors that drive procurement behavior. By combining data collection with adjustment to program implementation, we have created an iterative process that is having a demonstrable effect in improving the impact of a long-running program.

Although federal policies regarding energy-efficient product procurement (EEPP) are long-standing and well-established, federal buyers do not typically request energy-efficient products when making purchases. This is a large missed opportunity: full compliance could save the U.S. federal government roughly $500 million in energy cost annually. In 2016, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) began a new set of program activities to increase federal compliance with these procurement requirements. Program interventions included increased communication with contracting officers during the solicitation process; development of enhanced, targeted training; and collection and dissemination of procurement best practices across the federal sector. We have collected and analyzed ~2,500 solicitations from over 40 different federal agencies to evaluate the influence of these interventions. Compared to pre-intervention years (FY15 and FY11), annual compliance rates for FY16 and FY17 increased by about 10%. This paper provides an overview of the data collection process, analysis framework, intervention method, and results of our analysis. We discuss strategies to increase compliance rates by examining institutional factors that drive procurement behavior. By combining data collection with adjustment to program implementation, we have created an iterative process that is having a demonstrable effect in improving the impact of a long-running program.

Main Content

 


 
Changing Institutional Procure
ment
Behavior to Achieve Energy
Savings
Liyang Wang
1
, Christopher Payne
1
1
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Energy Technologies Area
August, 2018
LBNL
-
2001182
 
 
Disclaimer:
This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government.
While this document is believed to
contain correct information, neither the United States
Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of
their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for
the accur
acy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process
disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein
to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name,
trademark,
manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,
recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof, or the
Regents of the University of California. The views and opinions of a
uthors expressed herein do
not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof or
the Regents of the University of California.
Acknowledgment
s:
This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficien
cy and Renewable
Energy,
Fe
deral Energy Management Program
,
of the U.S. Department of Energy under
Contract No. DE
-
AC02
-
05CH11231.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

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Conference Name

2018 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings

Year of Publication

2018

Conference Location

Pacific Grove, CA