News

Latest Stories

TechWomen at Berkeley Lab, Oct 2015
October 21st 2015
"You are literally changing the world, and I am honored to be part of it, even if for few hours" said Arwa Guesmi, from Tunisia after her visit to Berkeley Lab. Guesmi is an Emerging Leader (EL) at the U.S. Department of State's TechWomen program. Nine TechWomen ELs from seven countries visited Berkeley Lab on October 14th to learn more about energy research and green technology. The visiting group was hosted by the Energy Technologies Area (ETA... Read More
October 16th 2015
When Meeting of the Minds participants visit Berkeley Lab’s FLEXLAB®, they won’t just see the world’s most advanced buildings efficiency test bed. They’ll also learn how the Global Partnership Alliance’s Integrated Systems, Guaranteed Performance, and iBOS initiatives are conjoining to transform commercial building energy efficiency, potentially saving... Read More
Evan Mills
August 31st 2015
Berkeley Lab energy analysis finds gaming computers consume $10 billion in electricity per year. In the world of computer gaming, bragging rights are accorded to those who can boast of blazing-fast graphics cards, the most powerful processors, the highest-resolution monitors, and the coolest decorative lighting. They are not bestowed upon those crowing about the energy efficiency of their system. If they were, gaming computers worldwide might... Read More
Sharon Chen sprays roofing material with soiling mixture.
April 14th 2015
Standards body approves Berkeley Lab’s method to mimic natural soiling of roofing materials. Cool roofs can help keep buildings cool, thus lowering the building’s energy use, while also mitigating the urban heat island effect by reflecting sunlight away from buildings and cities. But as cool roofs age and get soiled, how much of their reflectance do they lose? A collaboration led by scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley... Read More
http://facades.lbl.gov/
November 6th 2014
A new website intended to help architects, building engineers, and manufacturers develop and make better use of energy-efficient glazing and façade systems in commercial buildings is now available. Developed by the Windows and Envelope Materials Group of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), "Low Energy, High Performance Building Façade Solutions" is designed to help the... Read More
September 27th 2014
How cool is your roof? If you live in the California cities of Bakersfield, Long Beach, Los Angeles, San Francisco, or San Jose, you may be able to find out. Scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created an interactive map that displays the solar reflectance (also known as albedo) of individual roofs in these five West Coast cities. You can check out the map at... Read More
A house flooded up to the bottom of its windows.
April 14th 2014
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Working Group III, addressing the mitigation of climate change, has issued an executive summary of its Fifth Assessment report. The report updates policymakers on the technical and socio-economic aspects of climate change, including technologies and policies that can reduce impacts. According to its website, "The IPCC Working Group III assesses all relevant options for mitigating climate change... Read More
Stephen Selkowitz
April 3rd 2014
The editors of Engineering News-Record magazine have given Stephen Selkowitz is the 2014 Award of Excellence "for relentlessly working to reduce the carbon footprint of buildings and for moving the nation toward better building performance, as well as for being the master of commercializing energy-efficient building technologies and the mastermind of FLEXLAB®," the Facility for Low-Energy eXperiments in Buildings located at... Read More
Tianzhen Hong
March 3rd 2014
It is well-documented that prodigious amounts of energy and money have been saved by energy-efficient building technologies. California alone has saved billions of dollars, prevented tons of pollutants, and avoided having to build additional power plants thanks to its efficiency efforts. Still, the effectiveness of these technologies is dependent on building occupants not only using them, but using them properly. How much of an effect occupant... Read More
Looking south over lower New York City.
January 8th 2014
Green Light New York and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have partnered to develop a pair of "Living Lab" demonstration projects that will deploy innovative lighting, daylighting and shading systems in working New York City office spaces. The team has secured the participation of two Fortune 100 companies, each of which have committed to using an individual floor of their flagship NYC buildings as test beds for high performance systems.... Read More
December 14th 2013
See below for a link to "Cool Roofs Rising" from Ensia, an online magazine from the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota.
Example of a small data center
October 23rd 2013
October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Fifty-seven percent of U.S. servers are housed in server closets, server rooms, and localized data centers, in what are commonly referred to as small server rooms, which comprise 99.3 percent of all server spaces in the U.S. While many mid-tier and enterprise-class data centers are owned by large corporations that consider energy efficiency a... Read More
Honda smart home
October 22nd 2013
October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of “zero net energy” can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller... Read More
Raymond Weitekamp, Arman Shehabi and Stephen Selkowitz in Windows Lab
October 17th 2013
The 40th anniversary of the founding of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division at Berkeley Lab is November 1, 2013. Every Thursday during October, we’ll look back at a significant energy-efficient technology developed by EETD and its research partners. This Week EETD has developed energy-efficient technologies that are all around you, saving energy in your home and workplace. One of those is the low-e, or low-emissivity, energy-efficient... Read More
Figure 1. Miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) distribution in sample office buil
October 1st 2013
October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid 'Other' is the fastest growing energy use in residential and commercial buildings—devices such as computers, displays, printers and other office equipment, as well as small household appliances ranging from kitchen electrics like coffee makers, toasters, and mixers to fans, clocks and portable space heaters. To energy researchers these devices... Read More
September 29th 2013
PORTLAND – On hot summer days, 74-year-old HelenRuth Stephens doesn't dare leave her apartment. Not to get the mail or take out the trash. "You don't do it because you'll be breathless by the time you get back," she says. She suffers from asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Both affect her lungs. Hot weather drains her energy, she says, and makes it hard for her to breathe. Stephens is the type of person public health officials... Read More
Stephen Selkowitz
September 26th 2013
Building4change, a website that addresses to sustainability, innovation and best practice in the built environment, has named 13 people as Stars of Building Science Virtual Academy of Excellence for the year 2013. One of them is Stephen Selkowitz of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Cited as an “internationally recognized expert in window technologies, façade systems and daylighting,” Selkowitz was also the Head of EETD’s former... Read More
Outdoor view of the windows testbed facility.
September 4th 2013
Daylighting is the strategy of admitting light from the sun and sky to reduce use of electric lighting in buildings. Since lighting energy use represents 13 percent of the total primary energy used by buildings in the United States or 5.42 quadrillion Btus in 2010, these technologies can play a significant role towards meeting U.S. and state energy-efficiency and greenhouse gas emission reduction goals. Conventional windows cannot provide useful... Read More
Interior of the New York Times building
February 5th 2013
Designing a building holistically, and making sure that its components and systems work together according to design intent, can pay big dividends in energy savings and occupant satisfaction, according to a study by scientists at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the performance of The New York Times Building in New York City. Measured results from the post-occupancy evaluation showed a 24% reduction in annual... Read More
William Turner
January 22nd 2013
California's residential ventilation requirements in Title 24 (the State energy code for buildings) are designed to balance healthy home ventilation with efficient energy use, but some studies suggest that whole-house ventilation systems don't always meet their expected performance in either category. Commissioning, a systematic evaluation of the installed system to identify deficiencies and offer solutions can help homeowners achieve this... Read More
Stephen Selkowitz
December 21st 2012
The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that it will fund the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to develop a highly insulated energy-efficient window system with a smart automated shading. The project’s principal investigator is Stephen Selkowitz of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD), and leader of the Windows and Envelope Materials Group. Berkeley Lab will receive up to $1.5 million in funding.... Read More
Prototype of the building mapping instrument package
December 3rd 2012
ARPA-E (Advanced Research Projects – Energy) has announced 66 research grants to develop transformational energy technologies. Two projects were awarded to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) researchers. Researchers from Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will also participate in a third project awarded to the University of California, Berkeley. Three-dimensional maps of commercial buildings... Read More
NOVA by Saint-Gobain logo
November 29th 2012
This article was originally published on the website of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Molecular Foundry: Heliotrope Technologies, a Molecular Foundry spinoff company, has been declared the winner of the 2012 NOVA Innovation Competition. An Oakland, CA based start-up, Heliotrope works to develop energy-efficient electrochromic window coatings that can switch reversibly between three states: solar transparent, heat blocking, and heat and... Read More
A thermal image of a residence showing areas of heat loss.
October 25th 2012
The RESAVE website is a guide for homebuilders and energy auditors working in California on how to improve ventilation in existing residential buildings. A good mechanical ventilation system can help protect buildings and their occupants. Inadequate ventilation often leads to increased levels of moisture and pollutants in a home. https://homes.lbl.gov/... Read More
Chicken and vegetables being cooked in a skillet.
July 18th 2012
Help the Residential Building Systems Group of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division to model exposures to air pollutants in homes! Please take a few minutes and fill out our cooking survey. The survey asks questions about what and how you have cooked in past 24 hours in your home. The survey does not ask for any private information and should only take 10 minutes of your time. Previous work in the Residential Building Systems Group at... Read More
A wall thermostat being adjusted.
July 9th 2012
Alan Meier, a scientist in EETD and at the University of California, Davis, as well as Executive Editor of Home Energy magazine, has published an article there titled "Why Japan's ELectricity Crisis Matter." Here's an excerpt and a link to the full piece: You may not read about it on the front page of the newspapers, but Japan is undergoing a second electricity crisis. The first took place last spring and summer after the Fukushima... Read More
Screenshot of the Energy Information Handbook
January 12th 2012
Developed by Berkeley Lab Scientists to Help Building Managers Get Started Using These Systems to Increase Building Energy Efficiency The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy have released The Energy Information Handbook: Applications for Energy-Efficient Buildings Operations. This free book guides commercial building owners and operators who have no experience with energy information systems in... Read More
Logo for the BuildSys 2011 conference
December 2nd 2011
Congratulations to Francis Rubinstein and Dennis DiBartolomeo of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division, and Yao-Jun Wen of Philips Research North America. Their paper, "Co-simulation Based Building Controls Implementation with Networked Sensors and Actuators," won the Best Paper Award at the recent BuildSys 2011 meeting. Buildsys 2011 was the 3rd ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) Workshop On Embedded Sensing Systems For Energy-... Read More
The logos of SERDP and ESTCP are here
December 2nd 2011
The Department of Defense’s Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) recently announced the funding of 27 projects to demonstrate emerging energy technologies on military installations through its Installation Energy Test Bed initiative. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) and partner organizations were awarded two of these projects: Lawrence Berkeley National... Read More
November 22nd 2011
From Liisa O'Neill, Department of Energy, Office of Public Affairs: Who knew leaks could be costing Americans $5 billion every year? And that's not water leaks—it's leaks you can't even see. Typical air duct systems, both residential and commercial, typically lose 25-40 percent of heating and cooling energy, accounting for billions added to utility bills. But what if there was a simple mist that could seal thousands of leaks in 4 to 8 hours,... Read More

Pages